It is a tough situation that can also be uncomfortable—a colleague is diagnosed with cancer or other serious illness, and you want to do something, but you don’t want to interfere or impose. Theresa Dils recounts her story and how her co-workers were supportive during her cancer treatment.

You’ve watched the videos on YouTube. You try to resist, but you can’t help but grin big and let out a little laugh. Whether it’s a bulldog skateboarding down a sidewalk or a cat riding a vacuum cleaner, animals truly tickle our collective funny bone.

As guys race through life, many of us forget to make a pit stop and properly fuel our bodies. Fast food and microwave meals become routine, and our cooking skills get rusty.

Many people can benefit from more exercise. But after a long day at work and tending to obligations at home, making time for exercise can be an uphill battle. Come nighttime, there may be little energy or time left to be active. However, failure to engage in regular physical activity can be detrimental to one’s health.

A 2017 study from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation estimated that 792 million people across the globe lived with a mental health disorder. If that figure is startling, it’s likely even greater as a result of the pandemic.

To draw attention to the “Just Breathe” series of 20-Minute Takeaways, Erin Hildebrand found the perfect picture to illustrate how she and her colleagues were feeling.

Stress can affect anyone at any time. Men, women and even children experience stress, which can be triggered by professional, personal and social pressures.

The Last week of the Lift Project is titled “Giving is Living.” Giving is mostly thought of in terms of material gifts, goods and services that we give to others. While it is so important to give things to others less fortunate than ourselves, it is also vital to give from within the things we cannot put in a box.

After a long and cold winter, spring is finally here, and many people are eager to get outside to exercise. Whether you’re looking to incorporate a brisk walk during your lunch break or prefer to start your day with a long-distance run, Allegheny Health Network primary care sports medicine physician Jared Ramsey, DO, shares advice on how to safely re-boot your spring workout routine.

Silver linings can be more than poetic fodder and pretty pictures. Studies suggest that people who maintain an optimistic outlook, even when life clouds up with adversity, tend to enjoy a higher quality of life than those whose glasses are half-empty.

No matter what’s going on or where it might be going on, time is often of the essence when it comes to just about anything. The clock can be one of the biggest barriers to finding consistent routines, especially when it comes to exercising on a regular basis. But it doesn’t have to be. Check out how to squeeze in a quick yet still-effective workout that can generate real results, even if only 30 minutes are up for grabs.

Caring for plants yields more than beautiful flowers and tasty produce. As they plan, dig, prune and harvest, gardeners are cultivating better physical and mental health. It’s good news that interest in gardening surged during the pandemic. That trend may continue to bloom and bear fruit.

Yoga practitioners know that a daily dose of sun can help focus the mind, improve circulation and tone muscles. Now the face can get in on the action, as well, thanks to face yoga, an anti-aging exercise regime for the face.

Oatmeal, garlic, flax seeds, beans, almonds and apples — these foods may sound odd when grouped together, but for balancing cholesterol levels they are a recipe for successful health.

No matter what’s going on or where it might be going on, time is often of the essence when it comes to just about anything. The clock can be one of the biggest barriers to finding consistent routines, especially when it comes to exercising on a regular basis. But it doesn’t have to be. Check out how to squeeze in a quick yet still-effective workout that can generate real results, even if only 30 minutes are up for grabs.

Yoga practitioners know that a daily dose of sun can help focus the mind, improve circulation and tone muscles. Now the face can get in on the action, as well, thanks to face yoga, an anti-aging exercise regime for the face.

Muscle pain and muscle aches are part of life and can happen to just about everyone. Whether they’re from tension, stress, a sports injury or a medical condition, everyday living can sometimes be a literal pain in the neck — and exacerbate related bodily aches, too. These aches usually affect the support structures that allow movement in daily life: the bones, the muscles, the ligaments and the tendons.

Winter is the customary cold and flu season, and a time during which many people aren’t as vigilant about maintaining their health as they might be at other times of the year. This winter has the additional variable of the coronavirus pandemic, which surged into 2021 with a second wave of spread and infection.

Barbara Bell knows the importance of medical care and regular visits to the doctor, and why they’re vital for her during the pandemic. Bell, a retired teacher, has rheumatoid arthritis and takes medication that suppresses her immune system.

January is National Blood Donor Month, but there is never a bad time to be a blood donor and help save lives. Extreme winter weather in some parts of the country and seasonal illnesses often make it difficult for blood banks to maintain sufficient blood supplies during this time of year, so the American Red Cross urges healthy people to give now and encourage others to do the same. Without more donors, patients will not have the blood they need.

Whether it’s a cellphone, tablet, laptop or even a desktop computer, people are relying on their electronics now more than ever in the midst of the pandemic. As practically helpful as these devices are to connecting to family, paying bills and completing work tasks, are they as beneficial to the eyes?

A natural drug once seen as taboo by mainstream America may now be poised to help battle the country’s opioid crisis.

Getting a yearly physical in the middle of the deadliest pandemic in a century may seem low on the priority list, but keeping up with personal health in small ways throughout the year may save some trouble down the road.

Do you toss and turn at night? Do you often wake up feeling groggy and not quite ready to start your day. It could be your sleep environment; everything from the noise — or lack thereof — to décor, room temperature and the quality of your mattress could be disrupting your precious sleep time.

As challenging as the pandemic made spring and summer, it promises to make flu season significantly more difficult than usual, some in the medical community are saying.

There is an old joke that asks, How do you get to Carnegie Hall?

While many people across the nation responded to the arrival of COVID-19 by putting on “pandemic pounds” and feeling a sense of isolation and even depression, faculty and staff in the Manchester-Shortsville Central School District (Red Jacket) were meeting a challenge.

When it comes to describing his goal for The Lift Project, founder Darren Morton has three words.

As the population health and well-being consultant for the Finger Lakes Area School Health Plan, Ken Foresti’s goal is to find ways to better the lives of his clients.

After a couple weeks of feeling overwhelmed and even a bit blue in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic hitting the U.S., staff members at Penn Yan Central School District received some advice on how to feel better, thanks to Blue Zones; or, more specifically, to a four-week Blue Zones challenge.