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     The hot dry weather experienced throughout much of Indiana in late summer is bringing an early leaf drop to many landscape plants. But even under the best weather conditions, the shorter,…

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    After three years of depressed income, the Indiana farm economy will show signs of moderate recovery in 2019. The recovery will be led by record corn and soybean yields in the fall of 2018…

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• Harvest root crops and store in a cold (32 F), humid location. Storing produce in perforated plastic bags is a convenient, easy way to increase humidity.

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     At Healthy Hoosier Oil and Hunt Family Farm, they pride themselves on producing the highest quality products possible while being totally transparent in the ways they operate.

The citrus sale for Randolph Central FFA Chapter has begun. Each year members of the local chapter contact friends, neighbors, and relatives to purchase a wide array of products, which are, of…

If you are a new farmer or just considering the idea, you are invited to register for the Beginning Farmer East Regional Workshop. The event is 8:30 a.m.- 4 p.m., Oct. 28, at  Randolph County …

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An innovative online tool developed by a Purdue University engineering professor will allow farmers to process data collected from their fields without requiring them to share it with third-pa…

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Be alert. Slow down. Share the road. That’s the important safety message coming from several state agencies, who are urging motorists to watch out for slow-moving farm equipment this harvest season.

National

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Another week at the hands of Mother Nature. Snow, rain, sleet — we have had it all. The fields are wet under the stalks where we harvested prior to the precipitation, making ends greasy and soft for turning around and getting in and out of fields. Not much was moving late in the week or weekend, but Monday it was full bunny once again in the fields. Hoping to get a lot of acres covered before the next round of snow, rain, or whatever Mother Nature throws at us hits.

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We had a couple inches of snow last week that stopped harvest for a few days. We went back to picking corn Saturday and Monday morning and then switched back to beans Monday afternoon. Surprisingly, the beans were 13.5% moisture and were cutting well.

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If we turn the calendar back six months, like we did with our clocks this weekend, we’d find ourselves in the same predicament as we were back in the month of May. Very little fieldwork took place this past week, leaving Monday and Sunday as the most ideal window for harvest, if there was one. In my travels Monday as I headed to Wakarusa Nutritional Services with a tractor and a wagonload of corn, I noticed more soybean fields than corn that have yet to be harvested.

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Another milestone of the fall season has passed and I’m left scratching my head how we got here so fast. Halloween has come and gone, leaving piles of unneeded candy for the kids and fears of harvesting on Thanksgiving creeping in on some of us. We are moving right along on harvest. Another really good week and we will be getting close. We have about 30% of our corn to harvest. But, unfortunately, it’s all on the most outlying acres we farm. So, we kind have become a traveling harvest crew that goes home at night as we travel 20-some miles in one direction from the shop and 15 miles in another.

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Another week of hurry and wait. We should have had harvest completed two weeks ago, but yet again Mother Nature has reared her head and brought us an abundance of fall rains. We set some more records for the month of October. It was the hottest start to the month, the most rain received on one day in the month and then record lows to end the month. Halloween was brutal with temperatures in the low 30s and winds at 8 miles an hour. We only had 150 trick-or-treaters this year, and many were so wrapped up in coats, hats and gloves, I don’t know what their costume was.

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After the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the White House announced the 2019 Market Facilitation program, we noted that direct government payments were set to soar in 2019. The USDA’s most recent estimate of $19.5 billion in total direct farm payments is more than $5.5 billion more than 2018. The USDA’s initial estimated 2019 direct payments were $2.5 billion less than 2018 levels. This week’s post is an updated look at direct-payment trends and farm-level implications.

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OPINION  Let there be no doubt – climate change is a real, immediate and growing threat to national security, public health and our economy. But this past week the Trump administration decided to turn our back on the rest of the world by starting the process of withdrawing the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement.

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MARSHALL, Ill. — Clark County soybean producer Don Guinnip has been cited by the Illinois Soybean Association High Yield PLUS Quality program for consistently producing soybeans that rank very high in livestock feed value.

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WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — PurdueUniversity representatives will speak at the Hemp at the Crossroads Education and Trade Show in Indianapolis Nov. 16-17.

For a farmer who doesn't have a family member interested in continuing the farm, the biggest obstacle to farm transfer often is the ability of owners and seekers to find each other. Farm-link services have been introduced to help farmers transfer their farms by connecting them with new farmers. The need to connect is greater than ever. But there has been scarce research that explores their operations, outcomes and effectiveness.

IHAP®’s goal is to assess the progress of the whole person health journey for each participant. The program accomplishes this by establishing realistic goals and looking at the impact on and improvements to the participant. IHAP also seeks to measure and quantify these improvements, and continually look at the sustainability the changes the participant is making. This process documents the in-depth communication among the IHAP® team, the participants and their health care providers ... this testimonial was provided by a current IHAP participant.